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Cambridge Institute for Medical Research

CIMR’s mission is to determine the molecular mechanisms of disease in order to advance human health.

 

CIMR Research Advances

Read more at: A molecular mechanism for a rare form of diabetes

A molecular mechanism for a rare form of diabetes

Rare cases of diabetes have been described in infants which can include other symptoms such as neurodevelopmental delay, and are monogenic in origin. A small but growing list of mutations identified...


Read more at: A new mechanism for substrate recruitment by receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases

A new mechanism for substrate recruitment by receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases

The labs of Dr Janet Deane at CIMR and Dr Hayley Sharpe at the Babraham Institute work collaboratively to understand the structures and substrate specificities of certain receptor protein tyrosine...


Read more at: The molecular mechanism of a premature ageing disorder

The molecular mechanism of a premature ageing disorder

Nestor–Guillermo progeria syndrome (NGPS) is one of several ultra-rare genetic conditions caused by mutations in genes associated with nuclear envelope function. Dr Delphine Larrieu’s group...


Read more at: Clearing toxic aggregates in neurodegeneration

Clearing toxic aggregates in neurodegeneration

One important feature of certain types of neurodegenerative disease is the intracellular accumulation of certain misfolded, aggregated proteins which are toxic to nerve cells. Preventing the buildup...


Read more at: Molecular sieving: a new rare disease mechanism

Molecular sieving: a new rare disease mechanism

New CIMR research led by Dr Joseph Chambers, PhD student Nikita Zubkov and Prof. Stefan Marciniak has revealed a new mechanism for certain types of rare genetic disease. Their new publication in...


Read more at: The role of eIF6 in ribosome assembly and recycling

The role of eIF6 in ribosome assembly and recycling

Protein synthesis is a cyclical process in which ribosome components assemble to translate mRNA into protein, disassemble upon completion and are recycled back into further rounds of assembly. This...


Latest news

Read more at: Recognition for CIMR PhD student

Recognition for CIMR PhD student

26 January 2023

Congratulations to Dr Miriam Lisci, a former CIMR PhD Student who has been awarded the 2021-2022 Milo Keynes Prize for Outstanding Dissertation by the Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Degree...


Read more at: A spotlight on rare disease

A spotlight on rare disease

28 November 2022

We were very pleased to take part in RAREfest22, a two-day science, technology, community and arts festival organised by the Cambridge Rare Disease Network , and centred on people living with rare...


Read more at: Recognition for highly-cited CIMR researcher

Recognition for highly-cited CIMR researcher

16 November 2022

Professor David Rubinsztein FRS has been highlighted by Clarivate as a ‘Highly Cited Researcher’ in 2022. This is due to his highly-cited papers which rank in the top 1% by citations for field and...


New CIMR publications

Ron lab in collaboration with Elisa De Franco and Andrew Hattersley [University of Exeter] (EMBO Mol. Med 2023)
Infancy-onset diabetes caused by de-regulated AMPylation of the human endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP

Read group in collaboration with Tom Terwilliger [Los Alamos National Laboratory] and other members of the Phenix collaboration (Acta Crystallographica Section D, 2022)
Putting AlphaFold models to work with phenix.process_predicted_model and ISOLDE

Deane lab in collaboration with the Sharpe lab, Babraham (eLife, 2022)
Molecular mechanism of Afadin substrate recruitment to the receptor phosphatase PTPRK via its pseudophosphatase domain

Warren lab in collaboration with the Bergler lab [Graz] and Haselbach lab [Vienna] (Nature Structural & Molecular Biology 2022)
Visualizing maturation factor extraction from the nascent ribosome by the AAA-ATPase Drg1

Larrieu lab (Nucleic Acids Research, 2022)
BAF A12T mutation disrupts lamin A/C interaction, impairing robust repair of nuclear envelope ruptures in Nestor–Guillermo progeria syndrome cells

Rubinsztein lab (Nature Communications, 2022)
Compounds activating VCP D1 ATPase enhance both autophagic and proteasomal neurotoxic protein clearance

Marciniak lab (Science Advances, 2022)
Z-α1-antitrypsin polymers impose molecular filtration in the endoplasmic reticulum after undergoing phase transition to a solid state

Warren lab (Nature Communications, 2022)
eIF6 rebinding dynamically couples ribosome maturation and translation

Weekes lab (PNAS, 2022)
Human cytomegalovirus protein RL1 degrades the antiviral factor SLFN11 via recruitment of the CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex

Warren lab in collaboration with the Minczuk and Whitworth labs, MRC-MBU (Nature Communications, 2022)
A late-stage assembly checkpoint of the human mitochondrial ribosome large subunit

Huntington lab (Blood, 2022)
Mapping the Prothrombin Binding Site of Pseutarin C by Site-directed PEGylation

Weekes lab (eLife, 2021)
Efficacy of FFP3 respirators for prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection in healthcare workers

Griffiths lab (Science, 2021)
Mitochondrial translation is required for sustained killing by cytotoxic T cells

Ron lab (Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 2021)
Higher-order phosphatase–substrate contacts terminate the integrated stress response

Read lab (Proteins, 2021)
Assessing the utility of CASP14 models for molecular replacement

Warren lab in collaboration with the Revy lab, Paris (Nature Communications, 2021)
Somatic genetic rescue of a germline ribosome assembly defect

Ron lab (Nature Communications, 2021)
Structures of a deAMPylation complex rationalise the switch between antagonistic catalytic activities of FICD

 

 

 

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