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Cambridge Institute for Medical Research

CIMR’s mission is to determine the molecular mechanisms of disease in order to advance human health.

 

CIMR Research Advances

Read more at: Clearing toxic aggregates in neurodegeneration

Clearing toxic aggregates in neurodegeneration

One important feature of certain types of neurodegenerative disease is the intracellular accumulation of certain misfolded, aggregated proteins which are toxic to nerve cells. Preventing the buildup...


Read more at: Molecular sieving: a new rare disease mechanism

Molecular sieving: a new rare disease mechanism

New CIMR research led by Dr Joseph Chambers, PhD student Nikita Zubkov and Prof. Stefan Marciniak has revealed a new mechanism for certain types of rare genetic disease. Their new publication in...


Read more at: The role of eIF6 in ribosome assembly and recycling

The role of eIF6 in ribosome assembly and recycling

Protein synthesis is a cyclical process in which ribosome components assemble to translate mRNA into protein, disassemble upon completion and are recycled back into further rounds of assembly. This...


Read more at: Collaboration with the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit reveals a key step in mitochondrial ribosome assembly

Collaboration with the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit reveals a key step in mitochondrial ribosome assembly

A collaborative study between the groups of Drs Michal Minczuk, Alex Whitworth at the MBU and Alan Warren at the CIMR, published in Nature Communications, reports the identification of a critical...


Read more at: Mitochondria set the pace of killing

Mitochondria set the pace of killing

Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognise and destroy cells which are infected with viruses or are cancerous. This latter property puts them at the heart of new immunotherapies transforming cancer...


Latest news

Read more at: Prestigious honour for CIMR’s Director

Prestigious honour for CIMR’s Director

7 July 2022

Congratulations to CIMR Director Prof. Julian Rayner who was elected to membership of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO), a body dedicated to excellence in European life sciences. The...


Read more at: 2022 CIMR Research Retreat

2022 CIMR Research Retreat

24 June 2022

We were very pleased to hold our first in-person CIMR Annual Research since 2019. The busy programme included talks from early-career researchers, poster presentations and an interactive session on...


Read more at: Election of CIMR researcher to prestigious academy

Election of CIMR researcher to prestigious academy

9 June 2022

Congratulations to CIMR's Prof. David Rubinsztein for his recent election as a member of Academia Europaea. Invited members of this pan-European Academy cover the natural sciences, the humanities and...


New CIMR publications

Rubinsztein lab (Nature Communications, 2022)
Compounds activating VCP D1 ATPase enhance both autophagic and proteasomal neurotoxic protein clearance

Marciniak lab (Science Advances, 2022)
Z-α1-antitrypsin polymers impose molecular filtration in the endoplasmic reticulum after undergoing phase transition to a solid state

Warren lab (Nature Communications, 2022)
eIF6 rebinding dynamically couples ribosome maturation and translation

Weekes lab (PNAS, 2022)
Human cytomegalovirus protein RL1 degrades the antiviral factor SLFN11 via recruitment of the CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex

Warren lab in collaboration with the Minczuk and Whitworth labs, MRC-MBU (Nature Communications, 2022)
A late-stage assembly checkpoint of the human mitochondrial ribosome large subunit

Huntington lab (Blood, 2022)
Mapping the Prothrombin Binding Site of Pseutarin C by Site-directed PEGylation

Weekes lab (eLife, 2021)
Efficacy of FFP3 respirators for prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection in healthcare workers

Griffiths lab (Science, 2021)
Mitochondrial translation is required for sustained killing by cytotoxic T cells

Ron lab (Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 2021)
Higher-order phosphatase–substrate contacts terminate the integrated stress response

Read lab (Proteins, 2021)
Assessing the utility of CASP14 models for molecular replacement

Warren lab in collaboration with the Revy lab, Paris (Nature Communications, 2021)
Somatic genetic rescue of a germline ribosome assembly defect

Ron lab (Nature Communications, 2021)
Structures of a deAMPylation complex rationalise the switch between antagonistic catalytic activities of FICD

Griffiths lab (Journal of Cell Biology, 2021)
Signal strength controls the rate of polarization within CTLs during killing

Rayner lab (PLoS Pathogens, 2021)
Using Plasmodium knowlesi as a model for screening Plasmodium vivax blood-stage malaria vaccine targets reveals new candidates

Rubinsztein lab (Developmental Cell, 2021)
Glucose starvation induces autophagy via ULK1-mediated activation of PIKfyve in an AMPK-dependent manner

Marciniak lab (European Respiratory Journal, 2021)
Novel insights into surfactant protein C trafficking revealed through the study of a pathogenic mutant

 

 

 

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